Connect with us

BIG STORY

APC Parallel Congresses: Amosun, Aregbesola, Lai May Lose Out, Party To Back Governors

Published

on

There were strong indications on Sunday that in states where parallel congresses were held, the All Progressives Congress would recognize executive councils supported by incumbent governors in the APC states.

A member of the party’s national caucus, who confided in one of our correspondents, also said in non-APC states, the party would recognize congresses endorsed by the highest political office holders in such states.

It was gathered that if the party’s stand was anything to go by, chieftains of the party including Senator Ibikunle Amosun, the Minister of Interior, Rauf Aregbeola, and the Minister of Information and Culture, Lai Mohammed, might lose out in the power tussle in their states.

Violence and protests rocked the APC congresses that were held across the country on Saturday with factions emerging in states including Lagos, Ogun, Kwara, Osun, and Kano.

In Ogun State, a faction loyal to a former Governor of the state, Senator Amosun, which held its congress at the palace of Alake of Egbaland, elected Chief Derin Adebiyi as the chairman.

But another faction supported by the incumbent Governor, Prince Dapo Abiodun, held its congress at the MKO Abiola Stadium, where Chief Yemi Sanusi, emerged as the chairman.

In Kano State, while Governor Abdullahi Ganduje’s faction elected Abdullahi Abbas as chairman, while a rival group led by Senator Ibrahim Shekarau elected Haruna Zago to head the party.

The Lagos State APC congress, which was held at the Mobolaji Johnson Arena Stadium, was attended by Governor Babajide Sanwo-Olu.

Cornelius Ojelade emerged as the consensus chairman at the congress, while a rival faction, Lagos4Lagos, at the Airport Hotel Ikeja, elected Sunday Ajayi from the Agege Local Government to lead the party.

In Osun State, parallel congresses were also held by groups loyal to the state Governor, Adegboyega Oyetola, and his predecessor, Aregbesola.

In Kwara State, groups loyal to Governor AbdulRahman AbdulRazaq and Minister of Information and Culture, Mohammed also elected different officers.

On Sunday, It was gathered in Abuja that in line with its tradition, the APC would accord recognition to the governors and in some cases, the highest political office holders from states where the party was not in power.

A member of the party’s national caucus, who spoke to one of our correspondents on condition of anonymity, “so as not to jeopardize reconciliation efforts” said, “Why will a former governor want to challenge a sitting governor who we all know is the leader of the party in the state? It has been the practice to respect our sitting governors in such matters.”

This, our correspondents learnt, was in response to cases of parallel congresses in Ogun, Kwara, Enugu, and Kano states among others.

Besides APC-controlled states, parallel executive councils also emerged in some states not controlled by the party.

For example in Enugu State, a former Commissioner for Works, Mr Ugochukwu Agballah, and an ex-Chairman of the party, Adolphus Udeh, emerged as chairmen at the parallel congresses held on Saturday.

While Agballah emerged from the faction of a former President of the Senate, Chief Ken Nnamani at a congress held at Destiny Event Centre, Enugu, Udeh emerged from the faction of the outgoing Caretaker Committee Chairman, Dr Ben Nwoye at a congress held at the party’s secretariat.

Agballa, after his election, said that his emergence as state chairman of the party signaled a new dawn for the APC in the state.

Ude on his part, stated, “I want to also commend in a special way the Dr Ben Nwoye-led executive and the Enugu state congress committee for conducting a free and fair election today.”

In Sokoto State, two factions also emerged. A congress, which was held at the party state secretariat, was attended by a former governor of Sokoto State and Senator representing Sokoto Central, Aliyu Wamakko; Senator Ibrahim Gobir, the Minister for Police Affairs, Maigari Dingyadi, former Minister for Transport, Yusuf Suleiman, among others.

Isa Sadiq Acida was re-elected as the chairman at the congress while a splinter faction led by three-term federal legislator Abdullahi Balarabe Silame, produced Muhammad Daji as the chairman.

 

PUNCH

BIG STORY

Nigeria’s Stability More Important Than Our Pockets — Shettima Tells Senators-Elect

Published

on

Nigeria’s Vice-President, Kashim Shettima, has charged senators-elect to “vote wisely” when the upper legislative chamber is inaugurated next week.

The senate will elect its presiding officers for the 10th assembly on Tuesday.

Speaking during the ninth senate’s valedictory session on Saturday, Shettima told the lawmakers that the stability of the country is greater than that of their pockets.

There have been allegations that some senate president hopefuls are using money to woo senators-elect to vote for them.

Although the All Progressives Congress (APC) has nominated Godswill Akpabio, a former minister of Niger Delta affairs, for the position of senate president, Abdulaziz Yari, a former governor of Zamfara, and Orji Uzor Kalu, chief whip, have insisted on vying for the position.

The vice-president said the country’s interest should inform who they elect as senate president and deputy.

“To my incoming colleagues, I will leave you with a parable, ‘the stability of this nation is superior to the stability of our pockets’. On Tuesday, let us vote wisely, let us vote for the Nigerian nation,” he said.

The number two citizen described his colleagues as “friends who have become an integral part of my history”.

“We have served shoulder to shoulder in the face of adversity and worked relentlessly for the betterment of our nation,” he said.

Continue Reading

BIG STORY

BREAKING: DSS Confirms Godwin Emefiele’s Arrest [VIDEO]

Published

on

The Department of State Services (DSS) has confirmed the arrest of suspended Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN) governor, Godwin Emefiele.

It was earlier reported the arrest of Emefiele by the DSS, shortly after he was suspended by President Bola Tinubu.

But on Saturday, the Service, on its Twitter handle said Emefiele was not in its custody.

Despite the denial by the DSS, report has it that the former CBN chief was in the custody of the secret police.

But confirming the report on Saturday evening, DSS spokesman, Peter Afunanya, posted: “The Department of State Services (DSS) hereby confirms that Mr Godwin Emefiele, the suspended Governor of the Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN) is now in its custody for some investigative reasons.”

 

Continue Reading

BIG STORY

Talking Frankly On Removal Of Fuel Subsidy By Babajide Fadoju 

Published

on

Now that subsidy is gone, what is the plan?

Subsidies play a significant role in shaping economic policies in many countries, including Nigeria.

Subsidies are government incentives that aim to support specific industries or sectors by reducing the cost of goods or services.

However, the effect of subsidy removal on the Nigerian economy has been a subject of much debate and analysis.

Subsidies have long been used by the Nigerian government to support various sectors primarily the energy sector.

These subsidies are intended to stimulate economic growth, encourage investment, and alleviate the burden of high costs on consumers.

For instance, fuel subsidies have been implemented to ensure affordable prices for petroleum products, as Nigeria heavily relies on oil for its revenue.

Due to several imports, the subsidy on petrol has to be removed. For one the federal government cannot afford the subsidy payment anymore.

By removing subsidies, the government can redirect its spending towards more productive sectors.

The funds that were previously allocated to subsidies can be channelled into infrastructure development, healthcare, education, and other critical areas that can foster long-term economic growth.

The removal of subsidy is good for the industry; growth will be engendered as several players can now play competitively, efficiency will become the cornerstone to build on and this will aid product delivery to the end users.

The removal of subsidies can promote economic efficiency by allowing market forces to determine prices and allocate resources more effectively.

When subsidies are in place, they can distort market signals, leading to inefficiencies and suboptimal resource allocation. By removing subsidies, the government can create an environment that encourages competition and innovation, driving economic growth in the long run.

That is just one way to look at it, according to economic analysts, the removal of subsidies will trigger a temporary spike in inflation as the prices of essential commodities rise. However, over time, the market will adjust to the new price equilibrium, and inflationary pressures may stabilize.

One of the primary concerns surrounding subsidy removal is its impact on low-income households. These households often heavily rely on subsidized goods for their daily needs.

When subsidies are removed, the cost of living may increase, posing challenges for vulnerable segments of society.

To counter this, the government is prepared to review several areas of the fiscal economy. The government is prepared to review the minimum wage and provide palliatives for the most vulnerable.

More importantly, the money recouped from subsidy will be reallocated into infrastructure development and social programs, fostering sustainable economic growth.

It might be hard at first, but we will cross this rubicon and the country will be better for it.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

1. When was fuel subsidy removed in Nigeria?

Contrary to popular opinion, the subsidy regime was ended by the assent to the Petroluem Industry Act by the then president, Muhammadu Buhari in February of 2022. However, the nation was not ready and the budgetary allocation continued into May of 2023 – the end of the Buhari administration.

2. How does subsidy removal impact inflation?

Subsidy removal can lead to short-term inflationary pressures as the prices of subsidized goods or services increase. However, over time, the market can adjust to the new price equilibrium, and inflation may stabilize.

3. Are there alternative measures to subsidy removal?

Yes, there are alternative measures that can be considered before resorting to subsidy removal. These include subsidy reforms, targeting subsidies to specific populations, improving subsidy delivery mechanisms, and implementing fiscal consolidation measures.

4. What are the potential social implications of subsidy removal?

Subsidy removal can have social implications, particularly for low-income households. The increased cost of living may pose challenges for vulnerable segments of society. However, by redirecting resources, the government can implement targeted social welfare programs to mitigate the adverse effects.

6. What are the long-term benefits of subsidy removal?

The long-term benefits of subsidy removal include improved fiscal sustainability, increased government revenue, reduced corruption opportunities, economic efficiency, and the reallocation of resources to critical sectors.

Continue Reading

Most Popular